Storm
Storm

Storm


Storm is a beautiful cross between a pure-bred ameraucana and an olive egger from Alchemist Farm. She inherited those cute, fluffy cheeks and beard from her ameraucana mama. Storm has some very strong opinions about what is allowed when she’s working on her egg in the nesting box. I’m not allowed to disrupt her, or she lets out a loud chicken scream and tries to peck my hand. Her eggs are a beautiful bright blue, and I’m excited to see what color we get from crossing her with Ross the Rooster, who has genetics for dark brown eggs and speckles. We should get a beautiful shade of olive eggs from those babies!

Let’s take a minute to discuss olive egger genetics. For the first generation (called F1) of olive eggers you need 1 parent that has genes for blue eggs, and 1 parent that has genes for dark brown eggs. When a chicken lays brown eggs she adds the color like a coat of paint on the outside of the shell. When she lays a blue egg the shell itself is blue. Babies from a brown layer and a blue layer receive one of each type of gene from each parent, so the first generation olive egger has 1 blue egg gene and 1 dark brown egg gene. The result is an olive colored egg, with blue on the inside of the shell. If you keep crossing olive eggers back to olive eggers in subsequent generations (called F2, F3, etc) you end up with a wide variety of shades of olive and brown. After the first generation it is possible to have a chick that received 2 genes for brown colored eggs, so it’s impossible to guarantee olive colored eggs. The dark chocolate eggs in these subsequent generations tend to be just as beautiful as the olives, though. You end up with a true rainbow egg basket! Of course egg color genetics are more complicated than what I just described, but hopefully this gave you a basic understanding of how it works!